Friday, 8 January 2016

Returned to her family after 30 years

Reunited with biological family 30 years after war divides them

7 January 2016 Last updated at 01:39 GMT

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-35248926

This story was shown on bbc just recently and showed how you should never give up hope even when tragic circumstances take over your life. .....try look up the documentary on
bbc news channel ....one tragic story with a happy ending....

When this lady lost her adoptive Iranian father she went in search of  her  lost family some of whom were killed in a chemical weapon attack...

A Kurdish woman, who was adopted by an Iranian family as a child, has returned to Iraq to find her biological parents.

During the Iran-Iraq war a chemical attack on Halabja in north-eastern Iraq killed at least 5,000 people, and many children were taken to Iran for safety and treatment.

Maryam was one of those children and after almost 30 years she returned to find her biological family.

The Our World documentary The Lost Daughter of Halabja is on the News Channel 9 and 10


Tuesday, 5 January 2016

prayers offered for 6 year old girl crushed by bollard


“At some time between 5.45pm and 6.05pm on Monday, December 28 a six-year-old girl was on Quay Street, Lymington, when witnesses say she leap frogged a bollard.

"The bollard then fell and the child fell with it.

"The girl was taken to Southampton General Hospital where she remains in life threatening condition.


Sunday, 27 December 2015

The Nativity scene and crib 2015 at Our Ladies and St Joseph's Church



A nativity scene with a crib is the traditional special exhibition of the birth of Christ, Shown particularly during the Christmas season, of objects representing the scene of the birth of Jesus While the term "nativity scene" may be used of any representation of the very common subject of the Nativity of Jesus in art, it has a more specialized sense referring to seasonal displays, either using model figures in a setting or enactments called "living nativity scenes" in which real humans and animals participate

Nativity scenes exhibit figures representing the infant Jesus, his mother Mary, and Joseph. Other characters from the nativity story such as shepherds and sheep, and angels may be displayed near themanger in a barn (or cave) intended to accommodate farm animals, as described in the gospels of Luke.




A donkey and an ox are typically depicted in the scene, as well as the Magi and camels belonging to the Magi described in Matthew. Several cultures add other characters and objects that may be Biblical or not.




Often the Magi or wisemen from the east (three kings) are shown away from the crib as they arrived much later after the birth, several months infact.

It appears also the translation of the word "stable" was not exact since in that time the animals were kept indoors in the families main
living area. If the family had visitors they would honour them by allowing them to stay up stairs
If you were a member of the family you would stay with the rest of the family in with the animals.

Saint Francis of Assisi is credited with creating the first live nativity scene in 1223 (a "living" one) intending thereby to cultivate the worship of Christ, having been inspired by his recent visit to the Holy Land where he had been shown Jesus's traditional birthplace. The scene's popularity inspired communities throughout Catholic countries to stage similar pantomimes.

Distinctive nativity scenes and traditions have been created around the world and are displayed during the Christmas season in churches, homes, shopping malls, and other venues.




Friday, 25 December 2015

Happy Christmas and blessed new year 2016




Pope Francis backs peace efforts in Christmas Day message

Pope Francis said:-

"To our brothers and sisters, who in many parts of the world are being persecuted for their faith, may the child Jesus grant consolation and strength"

Pope Francis tackled war, terrorism and the migrant crisis in a wide-ranging Christmas message, calling for peace and reconciliation around the world.

The pontiff said he prayed for the success of recent UN resolutions for peace in Syria and Libya.

The Pope also condemned "brutal acts of terrorism", singling out France, Lebanon, Egypt, Tunisia and Mali.

Thousands of pilgrims turned out to see the address, known as "Urbi et Orbi" - to the city and the world.

Heavy security was in place around the Vatican as crowds lined the streets, as it has been since the 13 November Paris attacks carried out by Islamist militants.

This year also saw ongoing conflicts in the Middle East and Africa, while Europe grappled with record numbers of migrants arriving on its shores.

'Martyrs of today'

Pope Francis began by noting that "precisely where the incarnate son of God came into the world there was also plolitical tension "

The speech was delivered from the balcony overlooking St Peter's Square

He went on to urge Israelis and Palestinians to resume direct peace talks, and back international efforts to end "atrocities" in Libya and Syria.

Such acts, he said, "do not even spare the historical and cultural patrimony of entire peoples", a clear reference to the Islamic State group.

Speaking from the balcony of St Peter's Basilica, he described Christians being persecuted for their faith as "martyrs of today".

On the migrant crisis, the Pope said "may God repay all those, both individuals and states, who generously work to provide assistance and welcome to the numerous migrants and refugees".

He also referenced conflicts in Ukraine, Colombia, Yemen, Iraq, Burundi, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Celebrating Mass on Christmas Eve, Pope Francis called on Roman Catholics not to be "intoxicated" by possessions.

Monday, 7 September 2015




from 11am – 1pm
 on Friday 25th September 2015
josephs place
Lymington high st

What’s the World’s Biggest Coffee Morning about?

The World’s Biggest Coffee Morning is Macmillan Cancer Support’s biggest charity fundraising event. People across the UK, and sometimes further afield, hold a coffee morning, where donations on the day are made to Macmillan. In 2013 154,000 people signed up to coffee morning, raising a record £20 million for charity.

This year, Macmillan want to raise even more money to help change the lives of people affected by cancer.

How did it start?

The event started in 1990, when a local fundraising committee decided to hold a coffee morning where people came along to meet and mingle, as they might ordinarily do, but donate the cost of their coffee to Macmillan in the process.

The idea seemed such a simple, yet effective one that they suggested the model be taken up nationally. The first National World’s Biggest Coffee Morning was in 1991, when 2,600 people registered to hold coffee mornings across the country. Since then it has raised over £113 million in total for Macmillan Cancer Support.

Did you Know?

There are currently 2 million people living with cancer in the UK. By 2030 there will be 4 million. Macmillan Cancer Support want to make sure they are there for all of them.

One in three of us will get cancer and for most it will be the toughest thing we ever face. When you’re facing the toughest fight of your life, you need a team of inspiring people in your corner with you.

That’s who Macmillan Cancer Support are. They provide medical, emotional, practical and financial support and push for a better cancer care system. They are the team that gives you the strength and energy to face the fight and get through it.


Sunday, 23 August 2015

Joan had a birthday today

The whole church sang happy birthday to Joan  today and in addition we joined her in Joseph place to help cut her beautiful cake.




Tuesday, 21 July 2015

The flower festival 2015 Lymington

The FLOWER FESTIVAL last WEEKEND:
With lovely displays from our three parishes on the spiritual dimensions of
 Forest, Air & Sea.






































Took place Sat 18th - 10.30 - 4pm; Sun 19th 12 noon - 4pm;
Mon 20th 10.30 - 4pm.
 Donations were made to
Oak- haven Hospice & Church funds.